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Saturday, January 21, 2012

Today's Tech Tip for Lawyers and Normal People - Taming Multiple Word Docs, Spreadsheets

Today's Tech Tip for Lawyers and Normal People - Taming Multiple Word Docs, Spreadsheets


 


Too many windows! We all have too many dang windows open! I mean computer windows, of course. One contribution to taming the monster of windows run amuck while using MS Office Products? Office Tabs. I've just installed it. I've just shown it to my wife (an Excel maniac). We are both immediately convinced it's a good thing.


This handy plug in creates a new tab within Word, Excel, Powerpoint for each document/book/slide instead of a new "window". Until I became aware of Office Tabs, it never even occurred to me to wonder why Office 2010 doesn't function the way the more recent versions of windows and browsers do - by creating new tabs. This is free for non-commercial use. The paid version has additional functions. See the screenshot below (click image to enlarge):



Word to the wise: make sure you install the correct version. I have a 64 bit Windows system, but for some reason my MS Office 2010 is 32 bit. Also, if you install but Office Tabs isn't functioning, go to File - Options - Add Ins within your MS Office product and ensure that the Office Tabs Add In (plug in) is enabled. Good luck!

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Former Legal Secretary: Male Law Partners Expect Sex on Demand

A Former Legal Secretary: Male Partners Expect Sex


on Demand, are "Terrible Business People"


Male law partners:



  1. expect sex on demand;

  2. are terrible business people;

  3. are not team players;

  4. lack interpersonal skills; and

  5. are pompous pains in the ass.


This, according to a self-described former legal secretary who worked at some of the "biggest and best law firms . . . ." Read on for more pearls of wisdom.


In 2011, the American Bar Association published an article about the results of a survey conducted by a female law professor (Felice Batlan) in Chicago, who surveyed 142 legal secretaries (mostly women) and asked them various questions, including how they felt about working for female law partners. This story was of some national interest, and was reported by established newspapers, magazines and blogs all over the United States. The American Bar Association's article (written by a woman) can be found here; this writer's blog on the topic (and the relevant commentary) can be found here


On January 14, 2012 a self-described former legal secretary submitted a scathing public commentary on this website in response to the article, which was published herein in October, 2011. The full commentary can be found at the link above. Based on her comments and her current company's website, Ms. Eugenia Kaneshige appears to be a former New Yorker now living (or at least working) in North Carolina. She appears to be a "Job Search and Career Coach" . . . this writer wonders if trashing an entire gender is a good career move? Also, based on her expressed opinions and personal experiences, one would have to conclude that she would never, ever try to place a client of hers into a job with a male partner/supervisor (thus eliminating a huge percentage of available jobs for her clients).


There are some appreciable ironies here. Ms. Kaneshige criticizes the information obtained by Professor Batlan because it "depends on one SURVEY" (of 142 legal secretaries), yet Ms. Kaneshige's own commentary damning tens of thousands of persons is based on the opinions and experiences of one legal secretary - her. There are other obvious ironies here, but we'll leave those for you to discover.


The full hailstorm of sweeping criticisms of male partners from Ms. Kaneshige is listed below:


"As a job search and career coach who many years ago put herself through undergraduate and graduate school by working as a legal secretary in quite a few of the biggest and ‘best’ law firms in NYC, I can tell you that:



  • Male partners are passive/aggressive.

  • Male partners are emotional/personal.

  • Male partners are inflexible.

  • Male partners tend to be demeaning to anyone of lesser status.

  • They are such pompous “pains in the ass!”

  • They are mostly mean, often emotional, and can’t handle the stress. Their attitude/lack of maturity somehow involves your being a punching bag.


In addition,



  • Male partners believe that sex on demand is their right.

  • Male partners have egos bigger than the Titanic.

  • Male partners are terrible business people.

  • Male partners are all about power and control.

  • Male partners lack interpersonal skills.

  • Male partners are not team players."


===================


Wow.

Friday, January 13, 2012

North Carolina LLC Partners - Fiduciary Duty

Does my North Carolina LLC Business Partner Owe


Me a Fiduciary Duty?


In this short video blog, Attorney Jason A. McGrath discusses whether a partner (member) in a North Carolina limited liability company (LLC) owes a fiduciary duty to other partners (members). This is one of the more common questions that Mr. McGrath is asked by his business law clients. See the video below, or click here to view in You Tube


 

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Lawyers Per Capita in FL, GA, SC, NC, TN

What Percent of the Population in 


FL, GA, SC, NC, TN are Lawyers?


There are approximately 1,200,000 lawyers actively licensed in the United States, or .38% of the population.


If you were to throw 291 stones at Floridians, chances are you'd hit at least one lawyer, possibly native Floridian Jason McGrath. Of course, given that it's Florida, you may want to throw oranges.


In Georgia, you'd need 336 stones (or peaches) to plunk an attorney such as Jim Spielberger, a graduate of Georgia State University Law School.


In Tennessee, your volunteers would need to be handed 382 stones each to hit a lawyer; now that he's licensed in Tennessee, Jason McGrath had better get his helmet on.


Poor South Carolinians would be wearing their arms out just to smash one attorney - 493 stones! South Carolina has the second lowest ratio of attorneys of all the 50 states; Charleston (Mount Pleasant) resident Jim Spielberger is one such attorney.


Chucking rocks in North Carolina would also be tiring, with 461 of them tossed in order to feel mathematically confident that you've dinged at least one lawyer, which could be Charlotte resident Jason McGrath. NC, a nice place to live, has a very low concentration of lawyers.


Ohio residents don't need to make too many trips to the quarry; lawyers like Todd E. Gonyer can be struck within 323 stone throwings.


So which state has the most lawyers, per capita? Wellllll  . . . let's just say that it's a state whose residents, at least those in the southern part of the state, never seem to shy away from a good "debate". (Yes, yes, it's New York.). The Empire State has a whopping ratio of 1 lawyer for every 120 residents.


California has almost twice the total population of NY, but fewer lawyers.


The state with the least number of lawyers is North Dakota; the state with the lowest percentage of lawyers is Arkansas.


Not surprisingly the Northeast region has by far the greatest density of lawyers, with the Southeast and the Southwest having the fewest. 


Primarily due to semi-retired attorneys, the Southeast has the largest percentage of "idle" attorneys.


All data gathered by the American Bar Association.

Friday, January 6, 2012

LLC or S Corp for North Carolina Business

Should My New North Carolina Business be an LLC or an S Corp?


This short video blog by attorney Jason A. McGrath discusses the very common question amongst those forming new businesses in North Carolina: should I form my business as a Limited Liability Company (LLC) or an S Corp.? Watch below or click here for YouTube viewing.


  


 McGrath & Spielberger, PLLC provides business law services in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina and Tennessee. For those who only want or need basic advice or legal analysis, or who only need a small amount of an attorney's time, the Firm offers legal advice consultations in thirty minute blocks for a flat fee based on how much time you need. This way, you get professional advice but also control the amount you spend.

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Today's Easy Tech Tip for Lawyers and Normal People - Jan. 4

Today's Easy Tech Tip for Lawyers & Normal People


If you're like many of us, you may be doing all of these things on the internet at roughly the same time:




  1. researching a work issue;




  2. entering your Barclay's Bank US Airways Mastercard password for the 19th time with no success;




  3. failing to resist the link "Click here to see which celebrities have the best beach bodies"; and




  4. finally finishing your holiday shopping (yes, I know it's already January, but it's the thought that counts, right?). 




Nothing worse than having 8 pages open in Firefox at the same time (well, except having 8 pages open in Internet Explorer), especially if your boss walks in and you have trouble quickly figuring out which browser windows you need to downsize before you get fired. Well, get organized!


Just use multiple browsers. Let's review the 4 items above.




  1. Use Google Chrome to research your work issue, perhaps using one of the many helpful add-ons to automatically save pages, turn them into PDFs, or email them to yourself and others with a click of two buttons. 




  2. Use Firefox, with privacy options set to not to remember passwords, for your online banking.




  3. Use Internet Explorer for the kind of junk you'd rather not admit to surfing, since you may not want to admit to using IE anyhow. This way it's easy to remember which browser to immediately close when someone else enters the room. (Hint: set your options to erase your history upon the browser closing!)




  4. Use Safari to finish your holiday shopping . . . Safari = Apple = iEverything = spend money.




If you get into a habit of using each individual browser for a certain type of internet use, you'll automatically know what is where and which window to pop back open as needed. Simple as pie, and it will keep you at least a little bit sane.